Bowl of Soul (Chamomile Latte)

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Smooth chamomile infused almond milk, drizzled with raw honey, with a sprinkle of dark chocolate, and a dash of cinnamon- pure bliss in a cup.

Earlier this year my friend was raving to me about a drink she had at a shop (The Naked Lounge, no naked people involved in case you wanted to know…) in Sacramento called “Bowl of Soul”, also known as a chamomile latte, topped with whipped cream, chocolate, and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

She knew that I love to recreate all types of coffee and tea drinks, so she asked, begged me to recreate it.

I am not one to say no to a challenge like that. I right away stepped up to the plate, and at our very next girls’ night, I brought the necessary ingredients over to make our long anticipated hot drinks. Let’s just say my version of the Bowl of Soul did not disappoint.

Right away it was given a stamp of approval.

While the flavour combination may be unusual, don’t be put off. I would never think that they could pair so beautifully together but they do.

Be still my tea loving heart, the Bowl of Soul has won me over. It may even take the place of London Fog as a new favourite, shh, don’t tell my poor Earl Grey that…

It’s almost fitting since I was a chamomile fan well before I discovered them joys of black tea.

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Bowl of Soul (Chamomile Latte)

3 cups almond milk
4 TBS dried chamomile flowers
3 TBS raw honey
2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 oz dark chocolate
Whipped cream, optional

Add the almond milk and chamomile to a sauce pan. Heat on low until hot. Turn off the heat and allow the chamomile to steep for 5 minutes.

Strain the chamomile or remove the tea bags. Add two tablespoons of honey and the vanilla extract. Stir until the honey has dissolved.

Froth the milk with a frother, or in a blender.

Divide the milk between two mugs.

Grate the chocolate over the two mugs, sprinkle with the cinnamon, and drizzle the remaining one tablespoon of raw honey over the top. Top with whipped cream if desired.

Bowl of Soul (Chamomile Latte)
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 3 cups almond milk
  • 4 TBS dried chamomile flowers
  • 3 TBS raw honey
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 oz dark chocolate
  • Whipped cream, optional
Instructions
  1. Add the almond milk and chamomile to a sauce pan. Heat on low until hot. Turn off the heat and allow the chamomile to steep for 5 minutes.
  2. Strain the chamomile or remove the tea bags. Add two tablespoons of honey and the vanilla extract. Stir until the honey has dissolved.
  3. Froth the milk with a frother, or in a blender.
  4. Divide the milk between two mugs.
  5. Grate the chocolate over the two mugs, sprinkle with the cinnamon, and drizzle the remaining one tablespoon of raw honey over the top. Top with whipped cream if desired.

 

London Fog Latte

London Fog Earl Grey Latte

Light, yet creamy and delicious.

Let me introduce you to the London Fog Latte, also known as an Earl Grey tea latte. Hot Earl Grey tea is blended with frothy almond milk, raw honey, and vanilla extract. It’s pretty much heaven in a cup.

I started drinking this delicious drink about a year ago when I saw it on a blog or in a shop somewhere, I can’t remember now. What I do know is that this delightful cup of goodness has found a special spot in my tea loving heart.

I have a confession to make, I went 30 years not putting milk in my tea. I could not stand the taste! That’s because I was using dairy milk, as soon as I tried almond milk I was in love. I have no idea why, I enjoy heavy cream in my morning coffee but I can not stand it in my tea. That’s okay, I’ll save my dairy for coffee and hot cocoa.

The London Fog is said to have originated in the Pacific Northwest, nowhere near the London England like I first assumed. It actually endears me to it all the more since I have so many friends “up north”.

A London Fog Latte is the perfect way to celebrate early spring, though I tend to drink it all year round. Now that I make my own Earl Grey tea, my french press has been known to hold tea leaves instead of coffee grinds. What can I say, a cup of tea and a good book like “Little Women” get me every time…

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book ling enough to suit me.”

~C.S. Lewis

I use orange blossom honey because it is simply amazing, as an added bonus it blends well with the citrus notes of the Bergamot.

London Fog Latte -www.nourishingsimplicity.org

London Fog Latte

2 bags (or 2 tsp) Earl Grey Tea
1 cup hot water
1/3 cup almond milk (or milk of choice)
1 tsp raw honey
1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Bring the water to a boil and pour over the tea. Allow to steep for 5 minutes. Meanwhile heat the almond milk.

Remove the tea leaves (bags), stir in the raw honey and vanilla extract.

Froth the milk with a milk frother is desired and pour into the tea.

5.0 from 1 reviews
London Fog Latte
Author: 
Serves: 1 mug of tea
 
Ingredients
  • 2 bags (or 2 tsp) Earl Grey Tea
  • 1 cup hot water
  • ⅓ cup almond milk (or milk of choice)
  • 1 tsp raw honey
  • ¼ tsp vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Bring the water to a boil and pour over the tea. Allow to steep for 5 minutes. Meanwhile heat the almond milk.
  2. Remove the tea leaves (bags), stir in the raw honey and vanilla extract.
  3. Froth the milk with a milk frother is desired and pour into the tea.

Have you ever tried a London Fog Latte?

 

How to Make Earl Grey Tea

How to Make Earl Grey Tea-www.nourishingsimplicity.org

You lift a delicate tea cup to your lips and watch the steam rise.

I have long been a fan of tea. While you may see more coffee recipes on this site, my first true love is tea.

That is probably why I created tea blends like Rosy Black Tea and Jack Frost Tea and wrote a book all about tea instead.

Pure and simple is how I like it, with maybe a touch of honey or stevia. I don’t even add milk, even if it is very unBritish of me for, as a women of English, Irish, and Scotish decent…

Occasionally tea will slip into a “fancy” drink like my Raspberry Hot Cocoa but not often as of yet. This spring there are a few recipes that might will change that. So stay tuned! 

I grew up an herbal tea drinker aside from a glass or two of iced black tea at my Grandma Stanley’s house each summer. Peppermint and chamomile were the only “teas” for me!

That all changed when I moved to Mexico and my dear British Candian friend introduced me to “Lady Grey Tea”. At that moment, the world of teas was transformed for me and I became an Earl and Lady Grey tea connoisseur.

How to Make Earl Grey Tea - www.nourishingsimplicity.org

There is hardly a day I don’t drink it. Since then Earl Grey has even shown up in my sorbet.

I wouldn’t be Katie Mae if I didn’t create tea blends. So I decided it was high time I started making my own Earl Gery because why not…? 🙂

Learning how to make Earl Grey tea is very simple, you need just two ingredients, black tea (organic is preferred) and high-quality Bergamot essential oil.

How to Make Earl Grey Tea

1 cup black tea
20 drops Bergamot Essential Oil 

Pour the tea into a pint sized glass jar. Add the Bergamot essential oil. Screw on the lid and shake vigorously.

Allow to rest for a day or two to before making your first cup of tea.

Steep one teaspoon of tea in water just off a boil for 3-5 minutes.

What is your favourite type of tea?

 

 

 

“Dirty” Iced Chai

Dirty Iced Chai- www.nourishingsimplicity.org

The weather has definitely heated up in the Central Valley. When the temperature jumps over 100 degrees there is no doubt that summer is here to stay for the next few months. What better way to beat the heat than a delicious cold beverage?

If you couldn’t already guess I really enjoy hot and cold drinks. I guess you could call it my “thing”. This delightful cool drink is the perfect marriage of my two favourite drinks, tea and coffee. Really how can it get much better than that?

This iced chai starts out unassuming but then the spicy tea is laced with espresso (hence the “dirty”), raw cream, and touch of maple syrup. Be still my heart it. is. amazing!

Dirty Chai

I like to keep a jar of chai concentrate in the fridge (and on the rare occasion I remember a jar of cold brew coffee), making this iced drink easy to whip up. I normally make espresso in the morning in my stove-top percolator, so I tend to use the coffee left over for my iced “dirty’ chai. If you don’t have raw cream you can use low-vat or pasteurized cream from the store (I avoid ultra-pasteurized), coconut milk or almond milk. If you want to make this sugar-free try using stevia drops in place of the maple syrup.

For an added coffee flavor replace your regular ice cubes with coffee ice cubes!

Other Cold Drinks to Enjoy:

*This is similar to the percolator that I use. Mine was from IKEA, which is really the better price but it gives you an idea of what to look for.

"Dirty" Chai Tea
Author: 
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Add your desired amount of ice to a cup. Pour the espresso, chai, water, maple syrup, and vanilla extract over the ice. Stir to mix. Gently pour in the cream or milk of your choice.

 What is your favourite cold drink?

Tea 101: Understanding The Different Types Of Tea

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Tea is the most popular drink in the world outside of water. It has nourished both the body and soul over the ages. There is little I enjoy more than a refreshing glass of ice tea in the summer or hot mug of tea on a fridged day.

There is such a beauty to tea and the fellowship that is enjoyed while savoring it. The simplistic beauty of it is what inspired my book Steeped: Simple Nourishing Teas and Treats.

The delights of a cup of tea can not be denied nor can it’s amazing health benefits.

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There can be a bit of a confusion when it comes to what tea really is. All true teas come from the Camellia sinensis plant; the difference in black, green, oolong, and white teas is the way they are processed. There are other infusions that we consider “tea” that actually consist of herbs, while still enjoyable they are not true teas. (Though we love and enjoy them anyway.)

Join m at Bulk Herb Store for a  quick explanation of some of the most commonly drunk teas and infusions.